3d Home Exterior Design Online

Concept was created by London design firm WATG and won the Freeform Home Design Challenge in 2016

  • Experts will break ground on the house, called the ‘Curve Appeal’ in Chattanooga, Tennessee, later this year

  • The design draws inspiration from the Case Study House program developed between 1945 and 1966

  • The futuristic home will be the first of its kind and features a blend of curved angles and glazed windows

  • By Tim Collins For Mailonline

    Published: 12:43 BST, 5 February 2018 | Updated: 15:47 BST, 5 February 2018

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    Stunning concept images have revealed a glimpse of what homes of the future could look like, as preparations are made for the world's first freeform 3D-printed property.

    Experts will build a house called ‘Curve Appeal’ whose structure will be made from 28 panels, which will be 3D-printed off-site before being slotted together on-site to create two exterior walls, a roof and interior core.

    These four main sections will then be hoisted into place and joined together, and will feature a complex blend of curved angles and glazed windows.

    Although 3D printed buildings have been made before, this futuristic home - to be constructed in Chattanooga, Tennessee, later this year - will be the first of its kind, as it will contain no regular shapes or angles.

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    Designers are planning to build the world’s first freeform 3D-printed house later this year, taking a competition winning idea from concept to reality. The futuristic home will be the first of its kind, and features a complex blend of curved angles and glazed windows

    Designers are planning to build the world’s first freeform 3D-printed house later this year, taking a competition winning idea from concept to reality. The futuristic home will be the first of its kind, and features a complex blend of curved angles and glazed windows

    The house is the creation of design company WATG, based in London and California.

     The design for Curve Appeal draws inspiration from the Case Study House program, developed between 1945 and 1966.

    The program oversaw the design of 36 highly-experimental prototype residences, that could be constructed easily and efficiently, re-inventing the modern home.   

    The architects leading the program were famed for constantly pushing the limits in terms of minimalist materials, and striving to create open-plan spaces that focused on enhancing natural light.

    In a written statement, a spokesman for WATG said: 'Employing many of the same modernist design principles, Curve Appeal is the next evolutionary step, blurring the line between inside and out.

    'It’s important that the architecture and the environment work together harmoniously. 

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    'The chosen site is steps away from the Tennessee River in a beautiful wooded, sunlit area. 

    'This allows the house to blend seamlessly into the environment, whilst also being naturally shaded and protected from solar radiation. 

    'WATG is currently producing detailed design drawings and working in collaboration with the City of Chattanooga to ensure the project is advancing according to the intended timeline.' 

    WATG was awarded first prize in the Freeform Home Design Challenge in 2016 and given prize money of $8,000 (£5,700) to make its plans a reality.

    The house is the creation of design company WATG, based in Irvine, California, who were awarded first prize in the Freeform Home Design Challenge in 2016. The competition was aimed at architects, designers, engineers and artists. This image shows an exterior view of the home

    The house is the creation of design company WATG, based in Irvine, California, who were awarded first prize in the Freeform Home Design Challenge in 2016. The competition was aimed at architects, designers, engineers and artists. This image shows an exterior view of the home

    Participants were challenged to design a 600 to 800-sq ft (56 to 74-sq m) single-family home that rethinks traditional aesthetics, ergonomics, construction, building systems and structure. This image shows a kitchen and breakfast bar area

    Participants were challenged to design a 600 to 800-sq ft (56 to 74-sq m) single-family home that rethinks traditional aesthetics, ergonomics, construction, building systems and structure. This image shows a kitchen and breakfast bar area

     

    The 'freeform' stipulation meant that the buildings were not to be of regular or formal shape. As a result of winning the competition, WATG was awarded $8,000 (£5,700) and will have its Curve Appeal design constructed in Chattanooga, Tennessee. This image shows an open plan living space

    The 'freeform' stipulation meant that the buildings were not to be of regular or formal shape. As a result of winning the competition, WATG was awarded $8,000 (£5,700) and will have its Curve Appeal design constructed in Chattanooga, Tennessee. This image shows an open plan living space

    WHAT IS 3D PRINTING AND HOW DOES IT WORK?

    First invented in the 1980s by Chuck Hull, an engineer and physicist, 3D printing technology – also called additive manufacturing – is the process of making an object by depositing material, one layer at a time.

    Similarly to how an inkjet printer adds individual dots of ink to form an image, a 3D printer adds material where it is needed, based on a digital file.

    Many conventional manufacturing processes involved cutting away excess materials to make a part, and this can lead to wastage of up to 30 pounds (13.6 kilograms) for every one pound of useful material, according to the Energy Department’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Tennessee.

    By contrast, with some 3D printing processes about 98 per cent of the raw material is used in the finished part, and the method can be used to make small components using plastics and metal powders, with some experimenting with chocolate and other food, as well as biomaterials similar to human cells.

    3D printers have been sued to manufacture everything from prosthetic limbs to robots, and the process follows these basic steps:

    · Creating a 3D blueprint using computer-aided design (CAD) software

    · Preparing the printer, including refilling the raw materials such as plastics, metal powders and binding solutions.

    · Initiating the printing process via the machine, which builds the object.

    · 3D printing processes can vary, but material extrusion is the most common, and it works like a glue gun: the printing material is heated until it liquefies and is extruded through the print nozzle

    · Using information from the digital file, the design is split into two-dimensional cross-sections so the printers knows where to put the material

    · The nozzle deposits the polymer in thin layers, often 0.1 millimetre (0.004 inches) thick.

    · The polymer rapidly solidifies, bonding to the layer below before the build platform lowers and the print head adds another layer (depending on the object, the entire process can take anywhere from minutes to days.)

    · After the printing is finished, every object requires some post-processing, ranging from unsticking the object from the build platform to removing support, to removing excess powders. 

    The competition, launched by Branch Technology, an architectural fabricator specialising in large-scale 3D printing was aimed at architects, designers, engineers and artists.

    Participants were challenged to design a 600 to 800-sq ft (56 to 74-sq m) single-family home that rethinks traditional aesthetics, ergonomics, construction, building systems and structure.

    The 'freeform' stipulation meant that the buildings were not to be of regular or formal shape.

    Over the last year, WATG’s Chicago office has been developing their design with Branch Technology, 

    Wall section testing, research, and development phase of this revolutionary project is currently underway, working towards breaking ground later this year.  

    Once complete, the Curve Appeal home will have open and light-filled interior living spaces. 

    Over the last year, WATG’s Chicago office has been developing their design with Branch Technology, Wall section testing, research, and development phase of this revolutionary project is currently underway, working towards breaking ground later this year. This image shows another exterior view of the concept property

    Over the last year, WATG’s Chicago office has been developing their design with Branch Technology, Wall section testing, research, and development phase of this revolutionary project is currently underway, working towards breaking ground later this year. This image shows another exterior view of the concept property

    The design for WATG's Curve Appeal home draws inspiration from the Case Study House program developed between 1945 and 1966. The program oversaw the design of 36 highly-experimental prototype residences, that could be constructed easily and efficiently, re-inventing the modern home. This image shows a panorama of the interior of the home

    The design for WATG's Curve Appeal home draws inspiration from the Case Study House program developed between 1945 and 1966. The program oversaw the design of 36 highly-experimental prototype residences, that could be constructed easily and efficiently, re-inventing the modern home. This image shows a panorama of the interior of the home

    To build the structure, 28 panels will be 3D-printed off-site, before being slotted together on-site to create two exterior walls, the roof and the interior core. These four main sections will then be hoisted into place and joined together. Once complete, the Curve Appeal home will have open and light-filled interior living spaces

    To build the structure, 28 panels will be 3D-printed off-site, before being slotted together on-site to create two exterior walls, the roof and the interior core. These four main sections will then be hoisted into place and joined together. Once complete, the Curve Appeal home will have open and light-filled interior living spaces

    Passive strategies will be employed for keeping the building temperate, such as carefully located windows that can create a through-draft and features that can help foster warmth in the winter and keep the building cool in the summer

    Passive strategies will be employed for keeping the building temperate, such as carefully located windows that can create a through-draft and features that can help foster warmth in the winter and keep the building cool in the summer

    Passive strategies will be employed for keeping the building temperate, such as carefully located windows that can create a through-draft and features that can help foster warmth in the winter and keep the building cool in the summer. 

    It is hoped that the large expanses of glass will help to connect the occupants to the outside and to nature. 

    Using Branch Technologies’ Freeform printing process, complex design forms are no longer difficult or expensive to build. 

    Within the home, the complex shell geometry is not only aesthetically attractive but structurally functional. 

    Passive strategies will be employed for keeping the building temperate, such as carefully located windows that can create a through-draft and features that can help foster warmth in the winter and keep the building cool in the summer. This image shows parking space and a driveway

    Passive strategies will be employed for keeping the building temperate, such as carefully located windows that can create a through-draft and features that can help foster warmth in the winter and keep the building cool in the summer. This image shows parking space and a driveway

    Using Branch Technologies’ Freeform printing process, complex design forms are no longer difficult or expensive to build. Within the home, the complex shell geometry is not only aesthetically attractive but structurally functional. This image shows another exterior angle of the home

    Using Branch Technologies’ Freeform printing process, complex design forms are no longer difficult or expensive to build. Within the home, the complex shell geometry is not only aesthetically attractive but structurally functional. This image shows another exterior angle of the home

    The arching form provides structural rigidity to the residence, using various spring points throughout the floor plan, allowing the structure to carry roof loads and provide large open-plan living spaces, shaping structures in new ways without any restrictions

    The arching form provides structural rigidity to the residence, using various spring points throughout the floor plan, allowing the structure to carry roof loads and provide large open-plan living spaces, shaping structures in new ways without any restrictions

    The arching form provides structural rigidity to the residence, using various spring points throughout the floor plan, allowing the structure to carry roof loads and provide large open-plan living spaces, shaping structures in new ways without any restrictions. 

    Enlisting the services of Thornton Tomasetti, the team has been printing test beams and partial wall sections to examine their load bearing capabilities. 

    In generic printed beam tests, a three-foot long beam could carry a load of approximately 3,600 pounds (1,360 kg) while only weighing five pounds (2.3 kg). 

    The freeform printed matrix is essentially a small space frame, making it highly efficient. 

    The next stage will be to test the maximum load bearing qualities of each individual printed element of the structure. 

    Working alongside United States Gypsum, WATG and Branch Technology have been researching a variety of gypsum material components that could be applied on the printed structure to work as fire protection, structural reinforcement and to create a substrate for the application of finished wall materials. 

    WATG and Branch Technology have engaged Interface, a high-performance mechanical, electrical and plumbing design firm, to design a passive mechanical system with the aim of making the house net zero-energy. 

    That result of which is that the house will produce as much energy as it consumes, reducing its carbon footprint.

    Source : http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-5353075/Images-reveal-worlds-freeform-3D-printed-house.html

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